Tag Archives: drugs

Fifty Eight Thirteen

Fifty eight thirteen
Jo No Mercy
jo-no-mercy.tumblr.com
I got my copy for $1 at sticky

Personal writing covering observations and heavy emotional shit

Fragmented: This is one of those kind of zines that begin abruptly and finish in the same sort of manner: you’re dropped in the middle on a seemingly random entry point, swim with the currents, learn about this person, and get washed up on the final page from the zinemaker’s thoughts. Like being allowed into someone’s life for a limited amount of time before your paths no longer cross. It’s a pensive writing style, written from a bit of distance but still arresting and intense.

Aesthetic: That rough and ready cut and paste effort with a mix of patterns and image snippers roughly scissored down, the computer text with the occasional pen correction.

Strong: There are powerful scenes in here. Sadness. Glimpses of sobriety in between the distorted sense of reality of an addict, and glimpses of why the run from reality as well. The zine looks for meaning where there may just be none…being ‘together’ when you need to be falling apart. Being ‘proper’ in the face of rot and decay and disorder. It’s a powerful little unassuming read.

Rainy Day Trash Flowers Fun Pack

Rainy Day Trash Flowers Fun Pack
#rare

I got my $$$ copy at the Sticky Zine Fair, Melbourne half a year ago.
no contact details.
You can get yours by: being in the right place at the right time with the right coinage. This clan can be hard to pin down.

A fun pack of three individual comix in the classic fortune teller format. All written, drawn, measured, folded and trimmed to perfection by HTML Flowers, (the yellow zine) Jmke (the pink one) and one of Tasmania’s best exports and New York darling Simon Hanselmann (the green one).

Exotic: As advertised, the zines/comix are designed to be rotated, unflapped, folded, unfurled, refolded and opened out. The fortune teller format is now boycotted by comic crafternooners. Life is worth living again.

Genius: The utilisation of the fold. Each zine has been carefully designed to address the design challenge of a format that doesn’t have regular pagination. Hanselmann’s zine excels: each folding pattern forms its own narrative device: in ‘Werewolf Jones TM and Sons’ the first layer of folds makes up a rotational ‘exclusive hat prologue’. (I’m won already). Underneath each triangle flap, a character cycles the perimetre of the main centre comic, ‘Megg’s Will’. On the reverse side you get ‘Megg, Mogg & Owl’ which in turn opens out to a complete flattened sheet of Megg freaking out about not having a bulk stash of weed on hand and making that face that kids make when they’re about to burst into tears. Hanselmann is the master of expression and rendering puffy cat faces.

Heartfelt, Sad, Saddening: The anxiety of financial survival as told in ‘Little Needs A Job’ where you need to negotiate the folds through the numbering system. In this comic, Centrelink payments are cancelled, hospitalisation means you save money on food and the back up plan includes dealing or stealing. Dreams are for those who can afford them, as is peace of mind for someone with a terminal condition. Lots of hospital references and watching the character drink alone. I found this highly affecting.

Spacey Existential Gaming Reality Jamming: This untitled zine revolves around two computer game players and the internal game world which comes complete with visual computer glitches and repetitive imagery. Kinda works as a pisstake against gamers but also drawn in affection I suspect. Contains Kantian and Mary-Kate & Ashley Olsen references.

To accept this challenge: You have to find the balance between sequential and non sequential story telling. You want the comic to work at different angles.

Success rate: 2/3 zines in the funpack didn’t need to rely on numbering. All are self contained little comic worlds in their own right. And you get to play with them in your hand. Awesome.

– E.P

 

 

To here from Naivety number 6

Pete
wodenpete(at)gmail.com
I got my copy from the zinemaker, you can get yours by contacting them directly.  That doesn’t mean it’s free. It means you can contact them and make enquiries.

A personal zine of stories from the zinemaker’s life and odds and ends (cut outs, comics, articles)

Get this zine for: The opening article/account of the zinemaker of being a ‘workshy’ teenage pizza delivery driver in the 90s, driving his dad’s car around the suburbs of Australia’s capital.

I, at least, have an endless fascination reading about deliveries to suburbs which are later bulldozed. In his first job, the zinemaker learns the mechanisms of the adult workforce. Highly functional (and non functioning) potheads keep the local economy turning. It’s a culture where the most successful driver is also the most ruthless, where your boss will and does take advantage of your meek nature, and where it takes a coworker back at the shop to alert the zinemaker his tyre is flat – he’s been driving around all night blissfully oblivious, immersed in his own depression.

Then there are the delivery addresses: suburbs of unemployment, housing commissions, drugs and ominous baseball bats – areas that other pizza places won’t risk sending their staff. The zinemaker’s coworkers are either said residents of these areas or former teen criminals, who have staged hold ups with steak knives and tried to escape on their BMX bike.

It’s all poverty, eccentricity and… survival. Depressing and amusing at the same time. The environs and stories are more predictable than unpredictable, and more banal than sensational. And that’s the point, that’s the environment. It’s perfectly captured.

The other highlights: ‘Jimmy Waterford Fucks Out On Drugs’. Firstly, great title. Secondly, funny story from the 90s of a guy who thinks he’s dying from a drug overdose. Spoiler: he does not die. And it’s OK to laugh when you read this because it’s pretty funny and I love the insights time allows. Plus, it’s historical! Esctacy was a new drug to Canberra at the time.

Also, the ‘Great Moments in in Canberra Times History’ section. It only consisted of four clippings but they did deliver.

The rest of the zine: The interview with a punk guy who the zinemaker admires is really only of limited punk interest. There’s a write up about the American baseballer who is credited with starting the high five phenomenon which was cool, short and sweet and there’s two comics thrown in to the mix, which I found pretty average.

Aesthetic: Standard fare. Times New Roman, on plain white, nothing too crazy, no real effort to experiment with design. This is fine because the contents are where it’s at, and everything is simple and legible. Garden variety desktop publishing does the job.

Criticism: This zine is maybe a few pages longer than it needs to be. There’s a lot of spaces which felt conspicuous for being empty or just carrying super big font or unneccssarily enlarged material. I couldn’t help thinking a bit of tighter layout could make the whole thing more compact and none of the contents would need to be cut to achieve it.

You should also check out: I first discovered this zinemaker through ‘Better Things To Do’ which is a great docu-read about the Canberra punk scene  in the 90s.

-E.P